Crepe Myrtle Species Guide - Bonsai-En

Crepe Myrtle Species Guide

What Is Crepe Myrtle?

 
The crepe myrtle tree, also known as the "Lagerstroemia," is a deciduous or evergreen shrub or small tree that is native to Asia. It is known for its vibrant, long-lasting flowers that bloom in shades of pink, purple, red, and white. The tree's leaves are typically glossy and dark green, and they turn red, orange, or yellow in the fall. The crepe myrtle tree is hardy and adaptable, and it can be found in a range of climates and soil conditions. They have been widely cultivated as ornamental plants and they can be trained to grow as a single trunk tree or multi trunk tree, which is suitable for small gardens.
 
The crepe myrtle tree can range in size from a small shrub to a medium-sized tree, depending on the variety and growing conditions. They can grow up to 40 feet tall, but most varieties stay under 30 feet. The tree's trunk is typically thin and smooth, and its branches are often gracefully arching. The leaves of the crepe myrtle tree are glossy and dark green, and they are usually oval or lance-shaped. They are typically 2-4 inches long and 1-2 inches wide. In the fall, the leaves may turn red, orange, or yellow before they fall off.
The flowers of the crepe myrtle tree are its most striking feature. They bloom in shades of pink, purple, red, and white, and they are typically 2-4 inches wide. They appear in large clusters at the tips of the branches, and they can bloom for several weeks. The tree's flowers are followed by small, woody capsules that contain seeds. The flowers are also followed by exfoliating bark that reveal different colors of the trunk. The bark can be smooth and mottled, and it can range in color from grey to brown to red.
 
Crepe myrtle trees are native to Asia, specifically in China, Korea, Japan, and some parts of southeast Asia. They are typically found in warm and humid regions, such as subtropical and tropical forests, along rivers, and in other moist habitats. They are also commonly found in cultivation in many parts of the world, including the United States, Europe, and Australia. In the wild, the crepe myrtle tree can grow as a large shrub or a small tree, and it can reach a height of up to 40 feet. They have been widely cultivated as ornamental plants and can be found in gardens and parks in many parts of the world.
 

Crepe Myrtles Spread Across The World

 
The crepe myrtle tree was first introduced to the United States in the late 1700s. The tree was brought over by early American colonists, who likely obtained the plants from European botanical gardens. The tree quickly became popular as an ornamental plant due to its vibrant flowers and attractive bark. The tree was planted in gardens, parks, and along streets and roads.
In the early 1900s, crepe myrtles were introduced to the southern United States, particularly in states like Georgia, South Carolina, and Texas. They were found to be particularly well-suited to the hot and humid climate of the southern states, and they became a popular landscape plant. In the 1930s and 1940s, many new varieties of crepe myrtle were developed by plant breeders, which had different flower colors, growth habits and sizes, making it possible to adapt to different regions and climates. These new varieties were more compact, disease-resistant and had more vivid flower colors than the original species, which helped to expand their popularity across the United States.
Today, the crepe myrtle tree is widely cultivated in many parts of the world, and it is considered an important ornamental tree. With the many different cultivars, it's possible to find varieties that are well suited to different climates, from the hot and humid South to the cooler regions of the North.
 

Cultural Significance

 
The crepe myrtle tree holds significant cultural importance in different societies. In Asia, particularly in China, Korea, and Japan, the tree is considered a symbol of longevity and immortality. It is believed to bring good luck and is often planted in temple gardens and near graves. The tree is also associated with the summer season and is often depicted in traditional art.
In the southern United States, the crepe myrtle tree has become an important part of the cultural landscape. It is a symbol of the southern summer and is often associated with warm weather and long, lazy days. The crepe myrtle is often used in landscaping and can be found in many public parks and gardens, as well as in residential yards. The tree's vibrant flowers have become an important part of the visual identity of many southern towns and cities, and it is often referred to as the "lilac of the South."
In many societies, the crepe myrtle tree is also used as a symbol of beauty and grace. The tree's delicate flowers and graceful branches have been celebrated in art and literature for centuries, and it remains a popular subject for painters and photographers today.
Overall, the crepe myrtle tree holds a special cultural significance in different societies, whether it's for its longevity, beauty, or as a symbol of a particular season or place.
 

Types Of Crepe Myrtle

 
There are many variations of crepe myrtle, also known as Lagerstroemia, which is a genus of around 50 species of deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs. Some common variations include:
  • Lagerstroemia indica: This is the most common type of crepe myrtle and it is known for its large, showy blooms in shades of pink, purple, red, and white. It is also drought-tolerant and cold-hardy.
  • Lagerstroemia fauriei: This is a smaller tree or shrub that can grow up to 20 feet tall. It has dark purple flowers and is also known as the "Fauriei Crepe Myrtle."
  • Lagerstroemia speciosa: This is another popular type of crepe myrtle that can grow up to 40 feet tall. It has pink or red flowers and is known for its deep red fall foliage.
  • Lagerstroemia flammea: This is a dwarf cultivar that reaches about 4-5 ft tall and 6-8 ft wide, it has fiery red flowers.
  • Lagerstroemia x 'Acoma' : This cultivar is known for its pure white flowers, it is a deciduous shrub growing up to 6-8 ft tall and wide.
There are many more variations available and new cultivars are being developed regularly.
 
 

How To Care For Crepe Myrtle

 
Caring for crepe myrtle trees involves planting, pruning, and fertilizing. Here is some general information on how to care for crepe myrtle trees:
Planting:
  • Crepe myrtle trees should be planted in well-drained soil in a location that receives full sun. They can tolerate partial shade, but they will produce more flowers in full sun.
  • When planting, make sure to dig a hole that is at least twice as wide and just as deep as the tree's root ball.
  • Water the tree well after planting and keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged until the tree establishes.
Pruning:
  • Crepe myrtles should be pruned in late winter or early spring before new growth begins.
  • Prune away any dead or diseased wood.
  • Prune back the previous year's growth by about one-third to encourage bushier growth and more flowers.
  • Avoid topping or "pollarding" (removing all branches at the same height) crepe myrtle trees, this can be damaging to the tree and will not encourage more blooms.
Fertilizing:
  • Crepe myrtles should be fertilized in early spring with a slow-release fertilizer.
  • Follow the package instructions for the amount of fertilizer to use.
  • Crepe myrtles don't require much fertilizer, so be careful not to over fertilize, as it can burn the roots.
It's also important to note that crepe myrtles can be susceptible to pests and diseases such as powdery mildew and aphids. Regularly inspecting your trees and addressing any issues as soon as they arise can help keep them healthy.
It's essential to choose the right variety of crepe myrtle for your climate and soil conditions, and to ensure that it has enough space to grow, as these factors can affect the care and maintenance of your tree. You should also consider consulting with a local nursery or gardening expert for more specific advice on how to care for your crepe myrtle tree.
 

Here are some tips on how to maintain the beauty of your crepe myrtle tree and encourage blooming:

  1. Provide full sun: Crepe myrtle trees need at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day to produce the most blooms.
  2. Proper watering: Crepe myrtles need consistent moisture, but they don't like to be waterlogged. Water them deeply once a week during dry spells.
  3. Pruning: Prune your crepe myrtle tree in late winter or early spring before new growth begins. Prune away any dead or diseased wood and prune back the previous year's growth by about one-third to encourage bushier growth and more flowers.
  4. Fertilizing: Fertilize your crepe myrtle tree in early spring with a slow-release fertilizer. Follow the package instructions for the amount of fertilizer to use. Crepe myrtles don't require much fertilizer, so be careful not to over-fertilize, as it can burn the roots.
  5. Choose the right variety: There are many different varieties of crepe myrtle, and some are more suited to certain climates and soil conditions than others. Choose a variety that is well-suited to your area to make sure it thrives.
  6. Keep an eye out for pests and diseases: Crepe myrtles can be susceptible to pests such as aphids and diseases like powdery mildew. Regularly inspecting your trees and addressing any issues as soon as they arise can help keep them healthy.
To control pests and diseases, it's best to take preventative measures like providing the right amount of sunlight, water, and fertilizer, and pruning the tree correctly. If pests or diseases do occur, it's important to identify the problem correctly and to use the appropriate control method. For example, an insecticidal soap or neem oil can be used to control aphids, and good air circulation and avoiding overhead watering can help prevent powdery mildew. It's also important to seek the advice of a local nursery or gardening expert if you have any concerns about pests or diseases on your crepe myrtle tree.
 

Crepe Myrtle As Bonsai

 
Here are some tips on how to care for crepe myrtle bonsai:
  1. Provide proper light: Crepe myrtle bonsai need to be placed in an area that receives at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day.
  2. Watering: Crepe myrtle bonsai should be watered consistently, but they should not be allowed to dry out or sit in water. It's important to check the soil moisture regularly and to adjust watering accordingly.
  3. Fertilizing: Crepe myrtle bonsai should be fertilized with a balanced, slow-release fertilizer in the spring. Follow the package instructions for the amount of fertilizer to use.
  4. Pruning: Regular pruning is necessary to maintain the desired shape and size of your crepe myrtle bonsai. Prune back new growth to encourage bushier growth and more flowers. Prune away any dead or diseased wood.
  5. Wiring: Wiring is a technique used to shape and train the branches and trunk of a bonsai. Crepe myrtle bonsai should be wired when they are young and flexible. Be careful not to damage the tree while wiring, and check the wire regularly to make sure it is not cutting into the bark.
  6. Repotting: Crepe myrtle bonsai should be repotted every 2-3 years, in the spring before new growth begins. Use a well-draining bonsai soil mixture.
  7. Pest and disease control: Keep an eye out for pests and diseases, and address any issues as soon as they arise.
It's also important to remember that bonsai is an art form that takes time and patience. It's important to be consistent with the care and maintenance of your crepe myrtle bonsai, and to be patient as the tree grows and develops. Consulting with a bonsai expert or attending a bonsai class can provide more specific advice on how to care for your crepe myrtle bonsai.